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Liquid image camera masks.Liquid Image Goggles & Masks

By admin on July 15, 2021 0 Comments

 

Liquid image camera masks.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Best Seller.Scuba Diver Info – Liquid Image VideoMask Camera Mask

 

Liquid Image dive masks and ski goggles have an integrated video and still camera integrated into the mask and goggles so you can take pictures and record all the action. Best Seller Liquid Image Hydra Camera Dive Mask (). Unlike most digital cameras, which use CCD image sensors (the part that in conjunction with memory, replaces film), the Liquid Image mask uses a CMOS sensor. CCDs and CMOS technologies each have their individual advantages, with CMOS offering the kind of flexibility and low power consumption needed for a product like the Scuba Mask that can record HD video and also take still pictures. According to the manufacturer, this is the world’s only swim mask that has an integrated waterproof digital-video camera and the ability to take photographs at 5MP. The mask operates to a depth of 15 feet underwater and eliminates the need to hand-carry an underwater camera. It’s ideal for snorkeling or swimming pools/5(41).

 

Liquid image camera masks.Liquid Image Goggles & Masks | A Sight for Sport Eyes

Unlike most digital cameras, which use CCD image sensors (the part that in conjunction with memory, replaces film), the Liquid Image mask uses a CMOS sensor. CCDs and CMOS technologies each have their individual advantages, with CMOS offering the kind of flexibility and low power consumption needed for a product like the Scuba Mask that can record HD video and also take still pictures. Keep your hands free as you snorkel or Dive! This is the world’s only HD (x) Dive mask that has an integrated waterproof digital video camera plus photographs at 5MP. Operates to a depth of ft / 35m and eliminates the need to hand carry an underwater camera/5(7). According to the manufacturer, this is the world’s only swim mask that has an integrated waterproof digital-video camera and the ability to take photographs at 5MP. The mask operates to a depth of 15 feet underwater and eliminates the need to hand-carry an underwater camera. It’s ideal for snorkeling or swimming pools/5(41).
 
 
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Testing the Scuba Series 320 on a 120-foot dive at Turks & Caicos
Scuba Diver Info – Liquid Image VideoMaskHD Camera Mask

HOME Scuba! Blickenstorfer and Carol Cotton With so much to see underwater, a lot of divers take along a still or video camera. That’s a lot of fun, but it also means you have your hands full, and especially so if you also need lights.

That’s where the camera and video masks from Liquid Image come in. The Liquid Image masks come in various models suitable from snorkeling all the way to serious diving.

In essence, what you get here is a fully functional scuba mask that has a p high definition video camera built right into the mask. The camera, which can also take 5 megapixel still pictures, records onto a tiny micro-SD card of up to 32GB capacity.

The whole deal is powered by four AAA batteries, two on each side of the mask. And there are filters to correct for various water conditions. Below you can see what it all looks like. Yes, it looks unusual, and the Liquid Image mask is a surefire attention getter and conversation starter wherever you take it.

But let me state right upfront: The Liquid Image camera mask is not a toy. It is a serious product that can be used for underwater cinematography and documentation, and the mask itself works as well as any scuba mask I’ve ever used. And I say that based on considerable experience with the mask. We’ve used it in cold, murky water in San Diego’s “Wreck Alley” at depths to 90 feet, we’ve used it diving with sharks at depths to feet off the Caribbean islands of Turks and Caicos, we used it diving in Lake Tahoe at an altitude of 6, feet, and we used it drift and wreck diving off Cozumel in Mexico.

How does the camera mask work? How do you operate a camera that is built into your mask? For such a product to work, it had to be simple. And it is. All mask functions are controlled by a single rocker on the upper right side of the mask. That’s it. The camera mask has no other adjustments, settings or functions at all. And since you’re viewing things through the mask, there is also no conventional viewfinder or preview LCD. You can, however, not see the LCD while you are wearing the mask.

So how do you know the camera is turned on and what mode it is in? That’s what the status light is for. The control light is designed so that it can be seen with the mask on or off. When you turn the camera on, the light is red and indicates that the camera is in still image mode. Push the rocker to switch to video mode, and the light turns blue.

Push the shutter to start video, and the blue light blinks until you push the shutter again to end recording video. That’s all there is to operating the Liquid Image camera mask. For storage, the camera mask uses a microSDHC card. To view pictures or video, you can either use a microSD Card adapter with your computer, or connect the video mask via included cable see mini USB connector underneath the memory card slot. Basic specs As far as specs go, the camera mask can shoot either x pixel still pictures or p High Definition video.

The lens is fixed no zoom or auto-focus and is supposed to focus on subjects between about 1. The mask is powered by s four AAA batteries. There is the very small status LCD, but no conventional digital camera color LCD to use as a view finder or to look at images.

The technology behind the mask How can a bit of electronics built into a scuba mask record such amazingly good high definition video? It’s because recording and compression technology have advanced so much that the old rules no longer apply. This is largely possible due to the work of a Silicon Valley company called Ambarella, which was formed in to be a technology leader in low power, high definition video compression and image processing semiconductors.

This makes it possible to record on SD cards instead of tape or hard disk, which means there is no more need for an expensive and bulky tape transport assembly or finicky rotating media. With H. This means you can fit more video onto less space, making SD cards feasible. We used an 8GB card and that’s good for about four hours of p video. For an overview and explanation of Ambarella camera technology, click here.

The imaging part of the CMOS chip used in the measures about 10 x 6. I am not sure who makes this sensor, and it isn’t really important. Anyway, the result is that a slender circuit board fits into a cavity on top of the mask, and that little board contains all the circuitry, logics, optics and storage needed to record and store hours of high definition video.

From left to right on the picture of the board below, you can see the microSDHC card slot, the Ambarella compression chip, the CMOS imager, and a memory chip used for picture processing the does not have onboard storage memory. How does the mask itself feel? Every diver knows how important it is to have the right mask. A mask that leaks or doesn’t fit right can spoil or ruin an entire dive, and using the video mask means you have to leave your own mask behind.

That’s quite a leap of faith. The biggest concern therefore is whether the mask part of the camera mask is good enough and works for you. The answer is, it is good enough and then some, but every face is different and what might work for one person may not work for another. The mask itself is an attractive dual lens design. But is the mask truly for real? We had already found our answer in earlier test dives where we took the lesser and largely untested foot rated camera mask Model into the frigid, murky Pacific waters off San Diego and down to the wreck of the Coast Guard Cutter Ruby E.

Despite grossly violating that mask’s depth rating, the mask passed with flying colors. With the exception of different coloring, the looks and feels the same, and so we had no doubt that it would work well. We did up to five dives a day and many of them were deeper than feet.

The masks performed flawlessly. Water temperature was a balmy 84 degrees, visibility excellent, and I took the mask down to feet. There was no leaking or any malfunction. We found that Liquid Image had fixed some of the problems we had with the Model mask: the smoked silicon skirt virtually eliminated the distracting light and glare while still leaving the red and blue status lights clearly visible.

And the rocker that operates the camera’s two buttons works much better than having to push the buttons directly. The picture below shows me doing video of a reef shark with the mask.

Overall feel — It felt both liberating and sort of weird not to have anything in my hands. I had to constantly remind myself that I indeed was using a camera. Excellent mask — The mask part is really terrific. The mask never leaked and worked every bit as well as an expensive dedicated dive mask. Even divemasters commented on that. This is really a major selling point to serious divers who may ask if the mask itself is for real.

Cross Hatches — The lenses have cross hatches, which are meant to help you frame a subject and show you what the camera is recording. At first glance they seem intrusive but in actual use they were only mildly distracting.

The cross hatches helped to remind me I was using a camera, but they really didn’t help much in the framing. Optics — The viewing angle of the lens is very small.

Even with practice it is not easy to capture what you want. I’d much prefer a wide angle 28mm equivalent. The stated range of the mask is 1. Unfortunately, 1. Buoyancy — I initially wondered what the mask’s buoyancy might be. The mask is surprisingly light weight, weighing only slightly more than a regular mask. As it turned out, the mask wasn’t positively buoyant and it felt no different from a regular mask. Lights and operation — Some commented they couldn’t see the red and blue lights without readjusting the mask.

True, but it didn’t bother me much. And I found the rocker easy and intuitive to use. Bubbles — Since the camera lens sits smack in the middle of the mask, you often see bubbles in the video. That is quite distracting, and the only way around it is to either move so the bubbles go elswehere, or hold your breath while you tape.

That way, four expensive Lithium AAAs run down quickly day and a half, or perhaps six dives. Divemaster commented that this would make it too expensive for him to use it. I do think this is an issue as a lot of folks will simply record entire dives. Rechargeables may be the answer. That’s excellent and actually better than what we got from the lower-res model.

Playback — Playback can be an issue. Unlike the Video Mask ‘s x D1 video that creates. AVI files which play back smoothly and without any slowdown on even modest hardware such as an Atom-powered Acer Aspire One netbooks we used , the H.

Picture and video quality The quality of the still pictures and video we got out of the Liquid Image Scuba Series mask ranged from stunningly, amazingly good to very ho-hum.

The technology is absolutely capable of delivering razor-sharp, vibrant still pictures and stunning high definition video.

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